BayCare Health System Site Map Social Media Contact Us
Morton Plant Mease  
Find a Doctor Classes & Events Pay My Bill Financial Assistance Policy Donate Get E-Newsletter
Services About Us Locations News Health Tools & Articles Careers Contact Us
 
Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) font size
PrintEmail
Bookmark and Share
Back

HealthDay Articles & Information

Search Health Information   

Gout Management Is Focus of New Guidelines

Key practices for doctors, patients outlined by American College of Rheumatology

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Educating gout patients on diet, lifestyle choices and treatment objectives is among the recommendations in new guidelines to help patients and doctors fight the painful disease.

Gout, which affects nearly 4 percent of American adults, is one of the most common forms of inflammatory arthritis. Acute gout attacks can be debilitating and reduce patients' quality of life.

Diagnosed cases of gout in the United States have risen over the past 20 years and now affect 8.3 million people.

The American College of Rheumatology funded a collaborative effort among U.S. researchers to develop the new guidelines that educate patients in effective methods to prevent gout attacks and provide doctors with recommended treatments for long-term management of the disease.

Gout is caused by elevated levels of uric acid, which lead to the formation of crystals that are deposited in joints, resulting in excruciating pain and swelling.

Evidence suggests that increasing rates of gout may be due to factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and extensive use of two types of diuretics -- thiazide and loop -- to treat cardiovascular disease.

The guidelines were published Sept. 28 in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

"The [Arthritis Care & Research] gout guidelines are designed to emphasize safety and quality of therapy, and to reflect best practice based upon medical evidence available at this time," lead investigator Dr. John Fitzgerald, acting chief of the rheumatology division at the University of California, Los Angeles, said in a journal news release.

"Our goal is that these guidelines, along with educating gout patients in effective treatment, will improve adherence, quality of care and management of this painful and potentially chronically debilitating condition," he said.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about gout.


SOURCE: Arthritis Care & Research, news release, Sept. 28, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.